Are there any routers that connect to the net wirelessly? Our internet is provided by a hotspot.?

Are there any routers that connect to the net wirelessly? Our internet is provided by a hotspot.?
 1 following   27 answers
 Neil
There are routers that connect to the internet wirelessly. But via cellular telephone network, not wifi.

Here are some: https://smile.amazon.com/gp/aw/s/ref=is_...
 Chris
nver do this! ha la ma!
 tomb
Gg
 ?
yes
 Admiral Smith
You need a device that does a wireless bridge.
 Mike
hotspot
 Jason
If you're asking about a service that transmits data wirelessly to and from your house to the internet, then yes there are such services. They go by names such as "Wireless Broadband" and usually require line-of-sight connection to the nearest node.
 Richard
What I have done is to use a TP-Link TL-WA850RE WiFi Range Extender as a WiFi receiver, with the extended WiFi part of the range extender disabled. This receives an existing WiFi signal (from a hotspot) and allows this to connect to a computer by Ethernet. Instead of a computer I connected the Ethernet to the WAN port of a suitable wireless router. The router has to be the type that has an Ethernet WAN/Internet port rather than an ADSL or cable ISP port.

There are a few things to watch out for:

1) The subnet provided by the router must be different from the subnet provided by hotspot. If they are on the same subnet, the router will not route properly and Internet access may not work.

2) The WiFi network provided by a wireless router must be at least 4 channels away from the channel used by the hotspot. If the router and the hotspot are closer than 4 channels apart, then they may interfere with each other.

3) The network name provided by a wireless router must be different from the WiFi name of the hotspot. If you use the same network name, then you can end up with a network loop rather than connecting correctly to the hotspot.

I hope this helps.
 Chris
yes
 chrisjbsc
No. All routers need a wired connection to an ISP to provide internet connectivity.

If an email is sent through a private IP address, does that mean it was transmitted through a foregin country?If an email is sent through a private IP address, does that mean it was transmitted through a foregin country?If an email is sent through a private IP address, does that mean it was transmitted through a foregin country?If an email is sent through a private IP address, does that mean it was transmitted through a foregin country?

If an email is sent through a private IP address, does that mean it was transmitted through a foregin country?If an email is sent through a private IP address, does that mean it was transmitted through a foregin country?If an email is sent through a private IP address, does that mean it was transmitted through a foregin country?If an email is sent through a private IP address, does that mean it was transmitted through a foregin country?If an email is sent through a private IP address, does that mean it was transmitted through a foregin country?If an email is sent through a private IP address, does that mean it was transmitted through a foregin country?If an email is sent through a private IP address, does that mean it was transmitted through a foregin country?If an email is sent through a private IP address, does that mean it was transmitted through a foregin country?

20 gbps connection?


Hi guys, I was wondering if I got a 20gbps connection (2000 dollars a month) Will I be able to play games without ANY lag?
Update: I meant 10 gbps
 Follow   4 answers
 Caoedhen
 Best Answer:  The speed of your connection to your ISP is only one small part of the lag equation. Every single step between your computer and whatever server you are connecting to can (and will) add to the lag. It may be the server, it may be an overloaded switch 3 steps from the server and still 6 steps from you. You can never control the connection end to end, you have to rely on many steps in between. Any step with an issue will cause extra lag, even if you do have a 20Gbps connection.

Lag is a fact of Internet life... you can try to minimize it, but you cannot eliminate it.
 Aerialnine
Well you maybe paying for 10gigs , but no way are you receiving that.....reason....nic card ( your adapter ) is what is called a 10 / 100 / 1000 megs not gigs...... years back you had a 10 / 100 card....now with faster internet available the new cards are 10 / 100 / 1000.....so even if you have your card set for 1000 megs ( which is 1 gig ) that is the max.....
The 10gig package is so if there are numerous users on the line , they all will still get good internet speed...
As for lag.....all the other post have explained what can cause game lag.....
 PoohBearPenguin
Lag can also be caused by a slow computer. In that situation, no amount of bandwidth is going to help you.
 Dave
There will always be lag, you'll just have "less".

That connection is only good from your house to your ISP. After that, you no longer have a 10 gbps connection, you have whatever the connection is to the next hop.

vWireless Access Point with no power? Can t use PoE?

Wireless Access Point with no power? Can t use PoE?
How can I set up a wireless access point in a room that has no power available? The switch doesn t support PoE?
 Follow   5 answers
 lybomir
How much u will pay to love find this top model attached?
Edit
anyone will fell in love with her top model huh dont u wanna find her chat with her

0 following 1 answer
Answers
lybomir
lets find her webmasters what woudl u do if u were obssed in love wiht her like me close to suciide
 Paladin
Device does not do PoE. You do have an Ethernet cable from hither to yon, with power available hither.
Take the power adapter for the device. Cut in half. Slit your Ethernet cable, the Ethernet uses the orange and green pairs. Snip the blue and brown pairs, connect the chopped power adapter to the blue/brown to extend the power from hither to yon.
 Billie Green
Thank you both very much!
 Tracy L
If the AP uses PoE you can use the power adapter that comes with the unit (most do have one), plug the ethernet from the switch to the NON-PoE port on that adapter and the PoE side gets connected to the wire that runs to the room where you want the AP. The advantage of PoE is, you don't need power at the AP you need power somewhere in the ethernet line that feeds the AP. That can be anywhere in the line, it does not have to come from the switch.
If you do a search for PoE power adapters you will see that a single port unit will have TWO ethernet ports! One non-power (source) and one PoE outlet!
 dewcoons
PoE injector. It is a small "box" that has a power cord and an input and output for a network cable. You can located in anywhere along the network cable where you have an outlet. Usually you will put it in the "server room" or where the switch is located. You run a short network cable from the switch the input on the injector. You plug the cable going to the AP in to the other end. Plug it in to an outlet and it turns the network cable into PoE and powers the AP.

Warning, be careful to get the input and the output correct. You want the input to come in from the switch and the output to go to the AP. If you reverse them you could damage the port on your switch.

My laptop turns off WiFi and resets router just from connecting?


   So the wifi at home works perfectly fine, no problems. Until, I turn on my laptop. The router then gets reset, and wifi connectivity on all devices ends. I only have this problem at home, for some reason. It works perfectly fine everywhere else. Here are the things I've tried: - Restarting Router - Replacing... show more
 1 following   12 answers
 Big Log Da
It is a security issue between your lap top and your ISP ADDRESS INTERNET SERVICE provider. It might be Your lap top is reported Stolen and that's why you have problems with your lap top. But i really think you used your lap top to visit forbidden porn web sites and you owed the sites and you did not pay so it sent your devices address and ISP address virus to block your Devices address and default your internet connection. Its can be repaired if you take it in for servicing.
 Amanda
sounds like the router is being overloaded by something

and the thing that overloads it usually is - too numerous requests - too fast
(eg from say bittorrent client, or malware flooding the internet with requests)

a public router is a expensive high grade router, with lots of protection against such things (capacity and ability 'pace' those requests)...

i would check for
- unexpected installations
- that you are not using a torrent client (and if you are - turn its demands down)

next.........if getting very technical
connect via a cable......... and 'wireshark' (free utility on the web)
and i would look to see if it was being flooded - but some knowledge is needed for that...

ano option:
back up your pc......
and clean install it............ putting back only what you know and trust
as it does feel like something 'wrong' has installed itself...
 Andi
Sounds like the Router is being overloaded by something

and the thing that overloads it usually is - too many requests - too fast
(eg from say BitTorrent client, or malware flooding the internet with requests)

A public router is a expensive high grade router, with lots of protection against such things (capacity AND ability 'pace' those requests).

I would check for
- unexpected installations
- that you are NOT using a torrent client (and if you are - turn its demands down)

Next...if getting very technical
connect via a cable... and 'wireshark' (free utility on the web)
and I would look to see if it was being flooded - but some knowledge is needed for that.

ANO option:
back up your PC..
and clean install it.... putting back ONLY what you know and trust
As it does feel like something 'wrong' has installed itself.
 Teresa
no
 liminda
/
 Linda
which router make & model?
have you tried using an ethernet cable to see what happens?

wait -- you replaced the router and it happened again? make & model of new router?
----
we for the life of me cannot help you until you start answering some of our questions...
 Lou
No
 Richard
"Adjusting IP Addresses"?

What addresses have you been adjusting? Normally, unless you have special requirements, all devices should be set to their defaults. The router, especially a new one, will normally be set with reasonable IP settings. The laptop should, by default, be set to get its addresses automatically for its IP, gateway and DNS server.

Also, it should be totally impossible for a device to restart or reset a router over WiFi unless it is actually logging on to the router's configuration pages and accessing the restart or reset actions from there.

Things to try:

1) Change the routers configuration password to prevent any malware automatically logging on to the router.

2) Check that the laptop is set to get all its WiFi addresses automatically.

3) Delete the WiFi profile from the laptop for your home network and set it up again.

4) Make sure the laptop is not running a DHCP server.

5) Uninstall the driver for the WiFi adapter in the laptop and reinstall it.

Try these in this order. You might wish to create a System Restore point before you start so you can roll back to the current state if the problem still persists.

I hope this helps.
 V. Perkins
Which router? make & model?
Have you tried using an Ethernet cable to see what happens?

Wait -- you replaced the router and it happened again? Make & model of new router?
----
We can't help you until you start answering some of our questions.
 chrisjbsc
What laptop? What OS? What network driver?

Questions about internet connection for my new home?


the house will be two levels and is 2500 sq ft we plan to have cable tv that is connected to the internet 5 people with wireless devices two desktop pcs with printers multimedia server should we go with dsl or cable modem and why? do we need more than one access point? maybe one for each level? should we have... show more
 Follow   7 answers
 GTB
Definitely have provisions for wire links while constructed; in fact have the connections to the network outlets in a conduit from the wall box down to the basement so you can, in the future, add and / or remove cables. You will need more than 1 access point, probably 2 on main floor which will reach to both basement and second floor.
 Aerialnine
Wired will always be better then wifi....since the walls are open...I'd run both cable and fibre to each room...
 Adrian
If building a home, always run Ethernet cables to every room. In some cases, run 2 or 4 wires to rooms that may be media rooms.
Once the house is wired, you have options to run wifi, wired, or a combination of both. Also, wired ports in the rooms allows for adding wireless access points in any room with a weak signal from other wifi points.
Use Cat6 cabling, and run all the wires back to a place where you can install a "patch panel". From that, you run jumper wires to your router/switch to activate any room you want to (but you do not have to plug all of them in...)
Having 2 or 4 wires per room allows for not only a standard attached device, but variations like VOIP phones, Wifi access points, regular desktops, smart TVs, media players, network printers, etc... My den has 4 wired ports - computer, 2 printers, and a secondary router for other computer/laptop. I wish I had a spare port...

As for service, cable TV Internet service is faster than any DSL/ADSL
 paul
i'd go with cable rather than dsl, reason being dsl speed can fluctuate and speed dependant on distance from exchange etc ...cable steady and would due to the high number of devices and size of building would wired connections, if not would need use extenders for the wifi all around the house and so many devices over wifi you would be lucky for a video to run on a phone even lol One access point should be sufficient ,
 Neil
Wifi coverage and what type of WAN connection are two entirely different issues.

Wifi coverage is only loosely connected to square footage. What's way more important is lnear distance (this is where being on two levels may be an advantage,) what's in between, and noise floor.

More important than whether your WAN connection is DSL or cable (or other possibilities which are available in some areas, like microwave and fibre) is what speed is available, and how that compares to likely use.

The number of people and number of desktops matter less that what those people will be doing. One person streaming video requires more bandwidth than twenty people checking email.

Yes, it would be wise to install cabling throughout the house was n the initial build.
 David
If you have the choice I would go for cable - if it is available otherwise ADSL via the incoming telephone line. I would recommend a plan of a minimum of 50Mbps. In the UK this means Virgin Media or ADSL fibre to the cabinet Skye, openreach etc.

As the house is being constructed absolutely it would be far better to have data cables to most of the rooms, these would then all terminate back to the router (or better a patch panel). Make sure the ethernet ports are near a power socket for convenience. Ethernet is far more reliable that wireless which could be flakey in a large house. If someone need wireless then a wifi access point could easily be attached to one of the ethernet ports in a room

If you decide on wireless then you may need a wireless access point on each of the floors. This very much depends on the construction of the floors walls, neighbouring wifi networks, interference from cordless phones, doorbells,baby alarms, light fittings - the list goes on and on. Wireless access points would still need an ethernet cable to the router though. I wouldn't recommend wireless boosters, although they improve the signal, they actually reduce the speed by at least half. If multiple people are using wireless at the same time the bandwidth (which is usually less than ethernet) is shared between all the users.
 Tracy L
If you wire the building you will have much better speeds. Wireless is 1/2 duplex wired is full duplex. Wireless is subject to interference and "congestion" wired is not (at least when the wiring is properly done.) The desktops should be wired period! The laptops may allow you to use wired when you want and wireless when more convenient.

If you do use wifi no one, without a site survey, can answer whether you need more than one AP. Some construction methods will require two some will work just fine with only one. So no quick easy answer is possible. Wifi is indeed line of sight, but depending on where the main AP is located and what amount and type of obstruction is between the "host computer" and the AP there may not be any "obstruction" to the signal Sheet rock usually will let the signal pass even though it may weaken it, steel walls won't! Wood 2x4's will allow signal steel supports won't. So sorry, but there is no quick answer that would be correct for each situation. I know that isn't what you want to hear but that is fact and simply the correct answer.

At the present time cable will be faster than DSL! DSL usually has slower upload speeds even if the download matches. DSL usually is slower in download speed that are available. If fiber is available it is faster than either of those two! Go read up on DSL reports for what is available where you live (or where the house will be) those reports are good. ( http://dslreports.com )Questions about internet connection for my new home?
the house will be two levels and is 2500 sq ft we plan to have cable tv that is connected to the internet 5 people with wireless devices two desktop pcs with printers multimedia server should we go with dsl or cable modem and why? do we need more than one access point? maybe one for each level? should we have... show more
 Follow   7 answers
 GTB
Definitely have provisions for wire links while constructed; in fact have the connections to the network outlets in a conduit from the wall box down to the basement so you can, in the future, add and / or remove cables. You will need more than 1 access point, probably 2 on main floor which will reach to both basement and second floor.
 Aerialnine
Wired will always be better then wifi....since the walls are open...I'd run both cable and fibre to each room...
 Adrian
If building a home, always run Ethernet cables to every room. In some cases, run 2 or 4 wires to rooms that may be media rooms.
Once the house is wired, you have options to run wifi, wired, or a combination of both. Also, wired ports in the rooms allows for adding wireless access points in any room with a weak signal from other wifi points.
Use Cat6 cabling, and run all the wires back to a place where you can install a "patch panel". From that, you run jumper wires to your router/switch to activate any room you want to (but you do not have to plug all of them in...)
Having 2 or 4 wires per room allows for not only a standard attached device, but variations like VOIP phones, Wifi access points, regular desktops, smart TVs, media players, network printers, etc... My den has 4 wired ports - computer, 2 printers, and a secondary router for other computer/laptop. I wish I had a spare port...

As for service, cable TV Internet service is faster than any DSL/ADSL
 paul
i'd go with cable rather than dsl, reason being dsl speed can fluctuate and speed dependant on distance from exchange etc ...cable steady and would due to the high number of devices and size of building would wired connections, if not would need use extenders for the wifi all around the house and so many devices over wifi you would be lucky for a video to run on a phone even lol One access point should be sufficient ,
 Neil
Wifi coverage and what type of WAN connection are two entirely different issues.

Wifi coverage is only loosely connected to square footage. What's way more important is lnear distance (this is where being on two levels may be an advantage,) what's in between, and noise floor.

More important than whether your WAN connection is DSL or cable (or other possibilities which are available in some areas, like microwave and fibre) is what speed is available, and how that compares to likely use.

The number of people and number of desktops matter less that what those people will be doing. One person streaming video requires more bandwidth than twenty people checking email.

Yes, it would be wise to install cabling throughout the house was n the initial build.
 David
If you have the choice I would go for cable - if it is available otherwise ADSL via the incoming telephone line. I would recommend a plan of a minimum of 50Mbps. In the UK this means Virgin Media or ADSL fibre to the cabinet Skye, openreach etc.

As the house is being constructed absolutely it would be far better to have data cables to most of the rooms, these would then all terminate back to the router (or better a patch panel). Make sure the ethernet ports are near a power socket for convenience. Ethernet is far more reliable that wireless which could be flakey in a large house. If someone need wireless then a wifi access point could easily be attached to one of the ethernet ports in a room

If you decide on wireless then you may need a wireless access point on each of the floors. This very much depends on the construction of the floors walls, neighbouring wifi networks, interference from cordless phones, doorbells,baby alarms, light fittings - the list goes on and on. Wireless access points would still need an ethernet cable to the router though. I wouldn't recommend wireless boosters, although they improve the signal, they actually reduce the speed by at least half. If multiple people are using wireless at the same time the bandwidth (which is usually less than ethernet) is shared between all the users.
 Tracy L
If you wire the building you will have much better speeds. Wireless is 1/2 duplex wired is full duplex. Wireless is subject to interference and "congestion" wired is not (at least when the wiring is properly done.) The desktops should be wired period! The laptops may allow you to use wired when you want and wireless when more convenient.

If you do use wifi no one, without a site survey, can answer whether you need more than one AP. Some construction methods will require two some will work just fine with only one. So no quick easy answer is possible. Wifi is indeed line of sight, but depending on where the main AP is located and what amount and type of obstruction is between the "host computer" and the AP there may not be any "obstruction" to the signal Sheet rock usually will let the signal pass even though it may weaken it, steel walls won't! Wood 2x4's will allow signal steel supports won't. So sorry, but there is no quick answer that would be correct for each situation. I know that isn't what you want to hear but that is fact and simply the correct answer.

At the present time cable will be faster than DSL! DSL usually has slower upload speeds even if the download matches. DSL usually is slower in download speed that are available. If fiber is available it is faster than either of those two! Go read up on DSL reports for what is available where you live (or where the house will be) those reports are good. ( http://dslreports.com )v
If a tv isnt a smartv... All one would need to make it a smartv would be a wireless adapter(for wifi int.access) and something like a roku..?
like a roku stick for netflix and stuff? Thansk alot
 Follow   10 answers
 Peter Miller
Buy Play Station 4 or 3 (PS 3)
Where you can play any games and also access Netflix and also in Cromecast
It is much smarter and economic way to solve your problem.

 Allan
Buy a Compatible Blue-Ray player that is "Smart"


 David E
Any TV can be made smart with

Roku
Google Chromecast
Amazon Firestick
Apple TV
NVIDIA Shield

etc etc etc.

These generally out perform smart TV's

 Fried Potatoes
I like the Amazon FireTV stick - very nice if you already have an Amazon account.

 Dave
All you need is a Roku/Firestick/Chromecast/AppleTV device for your TV. They all come with wifi built in. Plug into HDMI, and you're good to go!

 Jason
Rokus and other streaming devices are wifi-ready. You don't need another wireless adapter.

 Jamey
Netflix doesn't work on all Rokus (it doesn't on mine). The best one to get is a Chrome stick, then you can cast anything at all from your computer using google chrome browser. They're about £35. I believe the newer Rokus you can use Netflix, mine doesn't, which is why I have a chrome stick, which does. You need an HDMI socket in your TV and a USB port (for power). If you haven't got a USB port, they come with a power cable so you need to make sure you have enough sockets near to your TV.

 Andi
Smart TV,
just means it has a Roku (or similar) built in..

So yes, buy a Roku
attach that to the TV on an HDMI cable
and set the Roku up on your Wifi.

That is also not only cheaper, but more long lasting than any 'smart tv'
as most smart TV's are not updated / maintained and even 'lose' their smartness after 2-3 years.

A Roku is both updated and cheap to replace (or add to)
A Roku also supports 100's of channels / suppliers not the handful the TV set manufacturer has chosen.

NB many Bluray players come with 'Smart' built in...
so can be as cheap to buy one of those as a Roku/other iPlayer box..
 Spock (rhp)
a wifi adaptor [USB type] for computers will NOT work with a tv.

the wifi signal has to be available to the roku stick [or similar]. that's fine when the stick itself connects to the wifi -- won't work if it doesn't
Source(s):
grampa
 chrisjbsc
No. You need lots more...If a tv isnt a smartv... All one would need to make it a smartv would be a wireless adapter(for wifi int.access) and something like a roku..?
like a roku stick for netflix and stuff? Thansk alot
 Follow   10 answers
 Peter Miller
Buy Play Station 4 or 3 (PS 3)
Where you can play any games and also access Netflix and also in Cromecast
It is much smarter and economic way to solve your problem.
 Allan
Buy a Compatible Blue-Ray player that is "Smart"
 David E
Any TV can be made smart with

Roku
Google Chromecast
Amazon Firestick
Apple TV
NVIDIA Shield

etc etc etc.

These generally out perform smart TV's
 Fried Potatoes
I like the Amazon FireTV stick - very nice if you already have an Amazon account.
 Dave
All you need is a Roku/Firestick/Chromecast/AppleTV device for your TV. They all come with wifi built in. Plug into HDMI, and you're good to go!
 Jason
Rokus and other streaming devices are wifi-ready. You don't need another wireless adapter.
 Jamey
Netflix doesn't work on all Rokus (it doesn't on mine). The best one to get is a Chrome stick, then you can cast anything at all from your computer using google chrome browser. They're about £35. I believe the newer Rokus you can use Netflix, mine doesn't, which is why I have a chrome stick, which does. You need an HDMI socket in your TV and a USB port (for power). If you haven't got a USB port, they come with a power cable so you need to make sure you have enough sockets near to your TV.
 Andi
Smart TV,
just means it has a Roku (or similar) built in..

So yes, buy a Roku
attach that to the TV on an HDMI cable
and set the Roku up on your Wifi.

That is also not only cheaper, but more long lasting than any 'smart tv'
as most smart TV's are not updated / maintained and even 'lose' their smartness after 2-3 years.

A Roku is both updated and cheap to replace (or add to)
A Roku also supports 100's of channels / suppliers not the handful the TV set manufacturer has chosen.

NB many Bluray players come with 'Smart' built in...
so can be as cheap to buy one of those as a Roku/other iPlayer box..
 Spock (rhp)
a wifi adaptor [USB type] for computers will NOT work with a tv.

the wifi signal has to be available to the roku stick [or similar]. that's fine when the stick itself connects to the wifi -- won't work if it doesn't
Source(s):
grampa
 chrisjbsc
No. You need lots more...

How i can conect my pc to internet whit wireless usb adapter netgear wn111v2?


Probably.

Assuming you have a Wifi access point in your house, and your machine supports that adaptor. (Windows versions and drivers etc)

Plug it in, load up the drivers, connect to a router that is connected to the internet, enter the passcode, connected.

Use the WI-FI
 Ty
Cool



What is my Wifi's username and password?


I want to know my Wifi's username and password so I can change the channel from 1 to something else. It should run at 150Mb/s but instead it's around 24Mb/s.
This is outrageous. Any help would be appreciated.

P.S : My internet service provider is Batelco.
Update: I tried "admin" as username and an empty password, didn't work. I tried "admin," as username and an empty password, didn't work... I also tried using "admin" and password as "password"... still didn't work. "admin," as username and "password"... show more
 Follow   12 answers
 Jessica
they are on the router, usually on the rear , if connected via wifi check the ssid (connection name ) and the properties ( password.........) you need take into account your pc wifi adaptor too............if a cheap wifi card not gonna get the max from the wifi.........restart your router and retry.........also check if not got lots of neighbours using the connection lol
 Elizabeth
> it should run at 150mb/s but instead it's around 24mb/s...

umm...... 4g/lte delivered internet
150mb/s is the very proper it can do (ideal conditions)
20-40 is more typical......



you do not seem to understand how things are connected......
and the difference between max imum it can work, and the slowest point in the link...

compare to:
you have a car that can go at 150 mph, but are on a road with traffic only able to move at 24mph......... you cannot go faster.........

your isp connection looks like it is max 24mb/s
so even if your wifi goes at 150......... you still for the life of me cannot get more than 24............ from the internet

yeah, locally - pc to pc, you shall get 150 (max) in one direction
-> but what they don't tell you is, it needs to answer back.........
so you normally get only half that ...... plus some losses/delays.........
so works out more like 30% (or 50mb/s) on wifi max.........
with a cable...... it can be more............

but that does not change what the isp brings to the house...
if that is 24............ it shall always be 24...

so connect with a cable to the router...
do the test 3 or 4 times......
and see what the usual value is - and that shall be your proper speed...

for the login to your router:
a) check for a label on it (especially if your isp has set it up)
or
b) go search the internet for 'default login xxxxx'
where xxxx is you router model and manufacturer.........
(from that picture in my link - huawei ......... no idea the model no)

but here may be of help
 Barb
> it should run at 150mb/s but instead it's around 24mb/s...

umm...... 4g/lte delivered internet
150mb/s is the very proper it can do (ideal conditions)
20-40 is more typical......



you do not seem to understand how things are connected......
and the difference between max imum it can work, and the slowest point in the link...

compare to:
you have a car that can go at 150 mph, but are on a road with traffic only able to move at 24mph......... you cannot go faster.........

your isp connection looks like it is max 24mb/s
so even if your wifi goes at 150......... you still for the life of me cannot get more than 24............ from the internet

yeah, locally - pc to pc, you shall get 150 (max) in one direction
-> but what they don't tell you is, it needs to answer back.........
so you normally get only half that ...... plus some losses/delays.........
so works out more like 30% (or 50mb/s) on wifi max.........
with a cable...... it can be more............

but that does not change what the isp brings to the house...
if that is 24............ it shall always be 24...

so connect with a cable to the router...
do the test 3 or 4 times......
and see what the usual value is - and that shall be your proper speed...

for the login to your router:
a) check for a label on it (especially if your isp has set it up)
or
b) go search the internet for 'default login xxxxx'
where xxxx is you router model and manufacturer.........
(from that picture in my link - huawei ......... no idea the model no)

but here may be of help
 Richard
What a pity you did not include the make and model of the router in your question. Often an ISP will supply a router that they source from a router manufacturer. If you have these details, download the manual from the router manufacturer's site.

It also sounds as though you are totally confused about WiFi, the WiFi pass phrase, and the log in credentials for accessing the router's configuration pages. If you want to change the wireless channel the router is using, then knowing the SSID and the WiFi pass phrase will not help you access the router's configuration settings.

As at least on other person has said, you should conduct a speed test using a fast PC connected to the router by Ethernet. You need to establish whether the ISP connection from Batelco is only providing 24 Mbps, or it is the WiFi that is limiting. WiFi is purely an interface between the router and your computer. WiFi does NOT come from the ISP.

If you cannot find the manual for the router online, contact Batelco for advice about the configuration username and password. Once you have these you should be able to access the WiFi settings to change the channel, and read or even change the SSID and pass phrase for the WiFi.

You should avoid doing a factory reset on the router. This will clear all settings, and may clear specific settings needed to connect to your ISP, which will leave you with no access to the Internet.

Is 150 Mbps the speed Batelco claim they are offering you, or are you quoting this because you have a 802.11N connection that has 150 Mbps as one of its possible speeds? If you want to measure WiFi speed, you need a computer connected to the router by Ethernet and a second computer connected by WiFi, then transfer a large file (1 GB or larger) between the computers and time how long the transfer takes.

You should also note, that wherever I have mentioned Ethernet in this answer, you must be using devices (including the router and modem if it is separate) that have 1 Gbps (1000 Mbps) Ethernet ports. If any one port in the path between the PC and the ISP is only capable of the more common 100 Mbps, then you will not get speeds over about 90 Mbps or 10 MBps from the ISP.

I have been trying to read the URL of the speed test site you are using. It looks like http://beta.speedtest.net however I have found that http://speedtest.net gives more consistent results than the beta site. It may work differently for you in your location, but I rarely use the beta site. Also, I tend to run my tests always to the same server as different servers can give very different results. Some speed test servers are very slow.

I hope this might help in some way. Good luck.



PS Well that's a first - YA seemed to garble my answer. Hopefully it not makes more sense.
 chrisjbsc
We don't know! Whatever you have it set to. BUT knowing your WiFi password won't help you change the settings - you need the Admin account and password for the router.
 Andi
> It should run at 150Mb/s but instead it's around 24Mb/s.

Umm.. 4G/LTE delivered internet
http://batelco.com/internet/mobile/devic...
150Mb/s is the very best it can do (ideal conditions)
20-40 is more typical..



You do not seem to understand how things are connected..
And the difference between MAX imum it can work, and the slowest point in the link.

compare to:
you have a car that can go at 150 mph, but are on a road with traffic only able to move at 24mph... you cannot go faster...

Your ISP connection looks like it is Max 24Mb/s
so even if your wifi goes at 150... you still can't get more than 24.... from the internet

Yes, locally - PC to PC, you will get 150 (max) in one direction
-> but what they don't tell you is, it needs to answer back...
So you normally get only half that .. plus some losses/delays...
so works out more like 30% (or 50Mb/s) on wifi MAX...
With a cable.. it can be more....

BUT that does not change what the ISP brings to the house.
if that is 24.... it will always be 24.

So connect with a cable to the router.
Do the test 3 or 4 times..
and see what the usual value is - and THAT will be your best speed.

For the login to your Router:
a) check for a label on it (especially if your ISP has set it up)
or
b) go search the internet for 'default login XXXXX'
where XXXX is you router Model and Manufacturer...
(from that picture in my link - Huawei ... no idea the model No)

But here may be of help
https://portforward.com/router-password/...
 Tom and Anna Marie
It is on the side of your ISP router on a label and it was listed on the ISP installers paperwork that he left you. However, you should have the information you are asking about because you are currently using it. The wifi name is the name of your home service that you are currently using.

accessing. The password is the same one you have entered each time you have setup a laptop, phone or gaming device. If you are using a router that has built in wifi, you may need to go there to change setup. This information is also on the label of your ISP box. WIFI changes are made within within the router using the wifi settings menu. To be clear-- you access your router menu by typing the ip address in the upper address bar on your browser. When it comes up, you type in the name and password of the router to gain access to the setup menu. One of the menu items is WIFI settings. It is there that you make wiki changes. Be careful when changing router settings as you can screw things up big time.
My router ip addresses have been such as 192.168.0.1 and 192.168.1.254 over the years.
 David
Initially before fiddling around changing the wifi channel, connect via ethernet and see if there is much difference. That will tell if the problem is with your wifi or not
 V. Perkins
1. You should delete that picture... it has someone's public IP in it.

2. You want to access your router's config settings. You do this by browsing to your router's private IP address (example: 192.168.1.1).

3. You can either search for your router's user manual yourself or tell us the make & model of your router.
 paul
look on your wifi towerWhat is my Wifi's username and password?
I want to know my Wifi's username and password so I can change the channel from 1 to something else. It should run at 150Mb/s but instead it's around 24Mb/s.
This is outrageous. Any help would be appreciated.

P.S : My internet service provider is Batelco.
Update: I tried "admin" as username and an empty password, didn't work. I tried "admin," as username and an empty password, didn't work... I also tried using "admin" and password as "password"... still didn't work. "admin," as username and "password"... show more
 Follow   12 answers
 Jessica
they are on the router, usually on the rear , if connected via wifi check the ssid (connection name ) and the properties ( password.........) you need take into account your pc wifi adaptor too............if a cheap wifi card not gonna get the max from the wifi.........restart your router and retry.........also check if not got lots of neighbours using the connection lol
 Elizabeth
> it should run at 150mb/s but instead it's around 24mb/s...

umm...... 4g/lte delivered internet
150mb/s is the very proper it can do (ideal conditions)
20-40 is more typical......



you do not seem to understand how things are connected......
and the difference between max imum it can work, and the slowest point in the link...

compare to:
you have a car that can go at 150 mph, but are on a road with traffic only able to move at 24mph......... you cannot go faster.........

your isp connection looks like it is max 24mb/s
so even if your wifi goes at 150......... you still for the life of me cannot get more than 24............ from the internet

yeah, locally - pc to pc, you shall get 150 (max) in one direction
-> but what they don't tell you is, it needs to answer back.........
so you normally get only half that ...... plus some losses/delays.........
so works out more like 30% (or 50mb/s) on wifi max.........
with a cable...... it can be more............

but that does not change what the isp brings to the house...
if that is 24............ it shall always be 24...

so connect with a cable to the router...
do the test 3 or 4 times......
and see what the usual value is - and that shall be your proper speed...

for the login to your router:
a) check for a label on it (especially if your isp has set it up)
or
b) go search the internet for 'default login xxxxx'
where xxxx is you router model and manufacturer.........
(from that picture in my link - huawei ......... no idea the model no)

but here may be of help
 Barb
> it should run at 150mb/s but instead it's around 24mb/s...

umm...... 4g/lte delivered internet
150mb/s is the very proper it can do (ideal conditions)
20-40 is more typical......



you do not seem to understand how things are connected......
and the difference between max imum it can work, and the slowest point in the link...

compare to:
you have a car that can go at 150 mph, but are on a road with traffic only able to move at 24mph......... you cannot go faster.........

your isp connection looks like it is max 24mb/s
so even if your wifi goes at 150......... you still for the life of me cannot get more than 24............ from the internet

yeah, locally - pc to pc, you shall get 150 (max) in one direction
-> but what they don't tell you is, it needs to answer back.........
so you normally get only half that ...... plus some losses/delays.........
so works out more like 30% (or 50mb/s) on wifi max.........
with a cable...... it can be more............

but that does not change what the isp brings to the house...
if that is 24............ it shall always be 24...

so connect with a cable to the router...
do the test 3 or 4 times......
and see what the usual value is - and that shall be your proper speed...

for the login to your router:
a) check for a label on it (especially if your isp has set it up)
or
b) go search the internet for 'default login xxxxx'
where xxxx is you router model and manufacturer.........
(from that picture in my link - huawei ......... no idea the model no)

but here may be of help
 Richard
What a pity you did not include the make and model of the router in your question. Often an ISP will supply a router that they source from a router manufacturer. If you have these details, download the manual from the router manufacturer's site.

It also sounds as though you are totally confused about WiFi, the WiFi pass phrase, and the log in credentials for accessing the router's configuration pages. If you want to change the wireless channel the router is using, then knowing the SSID and the WiFi pass phrase will not help you access the router's configuration settings.

As at least on other person has said, you should conduct a speed test using a fast PC connected to the router by Ethernet. You need to establish whether the ISP connection from Batelco is only providing 24 Mbps, or it is the WiFi that is limiting. WiFi is purely an interface between the router and your computer. WiFi does NOT come from the ISP.

If you cannot find the manual for the router online, contact Batelco for advice about the configuration username and password. Once you have these you should be able to access the WiFi settings to change the channel, and read or even change the SSID and pass phrase for the WiFi.

You should avoid doing a factory reset on the router. This will clear all settings, and may clear specific settings needed to connect to your ISP, which will leave you with no access to the Internet.

Is 150 Mbps the speed Batelco claim they are offering you, or are you quoting this because you have a 802.11N connection that has 150 Mbps as one of its possible speeds? If you want to measure WiFi speed, you need a computer connected to the router by Ethernet and a second computer connected by WiFi, then transfer a large file (1 GB or larger) between the computers and time how long the transfer takes.

You should also note, that wherever I have mentioned Ethernet in this answer, you must be using devices (including the router and modem if it is separate) that have 1 Gbps (1000 Mbps) Ethernet ports. If any one port in the path between the PC and the ISP is only capable of the more common 100 Mbps, then you will not get speeds over about 90 Mbps or 10 MBps from the ISP.

I have been trying to read the URL of the speed test site you are using. It looks like http://beta.speedtest.net however I have found that http://speedtest.net gives more consistent results than the beta site. It may work differently for you in your location, but I rarely use the beta site. Also, I tend to run my tests always to the same server as different servers can give very different results. Some speed test servers are very slow.

I hope this might help in some way. Good luck.



PS Well that's a first - YA seemed to garble my answer. Hopefully it not makes more sense.
 chrisjbsc
We don't know! Whatever you have it set to. BUT knowing your WiFi password won't help you change the settings - you need the Admin account and password for the router.
 Andi
> It should run at 150Mb/s but instead it's around 24Mb/s.

Umm.. 4G/LTE delivered internet
http://batelco.com/internet/mobile/devic...
150Mb/s is the very best it can do (ideal conditions)
20-40 is more typical..



You do not seem to understand how things are connected..
And the difference between MAX imum it can work, and the slowest point in the link.

compare to:
you have a car that can go at 150 mph, but are on a road with traffic only able to move at 24mph... you cannot go faster...

Your ISP connection looks like it is Max 24Mb/s
so even if your wifi goes at 150... you still can't get more than 24.... from the internet

Yes, locally - PC to PC, you will get 150 (max) in one direction
-> but what they don't tell you is, it needs to answer back...
So you normally get only half that .. plus some losses/delays...
so works out more like 30% (or 50Mb/s) on wifi MAX...
With a cable.. it can be more....

BUT that does not change what the ISP brings to the house.
if that is 24.... it will always be 24.

So connect with a cable to the router.
Do the test 3 or 4 times..
and see what the usual value is - and THAT will be your best speed.

For the login to your Router:
a) check for a label on it (especially if your ISP has set it up)
or
b) go search the internet for 'default login XXXXX'
where XXXX is you router Model and Manufacturer...
(from that picture in my link - Huawei ... no idea the model No)

But here may be of help
https://portforward.com/router-password/...
 Tom and Anna Marie
It is on the side of your ISP router on a label and it was listed on the ISP installers paperwork that he left you. However, you should have the information you are asking about because you are currently using it. The wifi name is the name of your home service that you are currently using.

accessing. The password is the same one you have entered each time you have setup a laptop, phone or gaming device. If you are using a router that has built in wifi, you may need to go there to change setup. This information is also on the label of your ISP box. WIFI changes are made within within the router using the wifi settings menu. To be clear-- you access your router menu by typing the ip address in the upper address bar on your browser. When it comes up, you type in the name and password of the router to gain access to the setup menu. One of the menu items is WIFI settings. It is there that you make wiki changes. Be careful when changing router settings as you can screw things up big time.
My router ip addresses have been such as 192.168.0.1 and 192.168.1.254 over the years.
 David
Initially before fiddling around changing the wifi channel, connect via ethernet and see if there is much difference. That will tell if the problem is with your wifi or not
 V. Perkins
1. You should delete that picture... it has someone's public IP in it.

2. You want to access your router's config settings. You do this by browsing to your router's private IP address (example: 192.168.1.1).

3. You can either search for your router's user manual yourself or tell us the make & model of your router.
 paul
look on your wifi tower

Which speed is faster? 768 kbps or 200 mbps?


 Follow   4 answers
 roger
well
758,000 vs
200,000,000
I would say that 200 million is faster than 768 thousand
 Richard
Most people will say 200 mbps is faster. To be pedantic about the units, they are wrong.

200 mbps (millibits/second) means 1 bit every 5 seconds. 768 kbps (kilobits/second) or 768000 bits/second is obviously much faster.

However, using the units you really meant of 200 Mbps (Megabits/second), which is a billion times faster than 200 mbps.

200000000 bits/second is faster than 768000 bits/second.

I hope this helps.
 Yami
200Mbps
 Alex
200 mbps, that's excellent internet speed, 768 Kbps is well below the average.

Will my Wi-Fi get faster if its turned off instead of turned on?


 Follow   14 answers
 Elizabeth
 Best Answer:  it works not 'cause it increases your speed it s 'cause when you turn off and then turn on......... the speed reaches to its maximum potential for few seconds then comes to the normal speed... it s like bike only......... when you turn on the key in the bike the speed meter indicator reaches to maximum then comes back to normal...
 Skyrexious
That my friend would be like hoping that your life is gonna get better after a series of unfortunate events. No, it will only get worse. Trust me.
 Ellie
Yeah sure definitely will get faster.100% proven.
 Me
lol are you serious? turn it off and find out.
 Richard
No. It will go very slowly - it will not exceed zero bit/second when turned off.
 Tracy L
LOL... think about that for just a couple of seconds.. OFF means what?
(Does you room get brighter when you turn off the lights?)
 Jamey
What do you mean? It won't work at all if it's off.
 Barney
It will work even faster if you ram its antenna down your urethra then snap your penile glad sideways.
 Master Of Puppets
???

If your wireless router is turned off, then it's not going to do anything; no Wi-Fi.
 chrisjbsc
No.

Can I get a router and connect it to my previously owned router so i can have router in my room to connect a ethernet cord to my pc?Can I get a router and connect it to my previously owned router so i can have router in my room to connect a ethernet cord to my pc?a

No

 Richard
Look at a Powerline network adapter kit such as:

http://www.tp-link.com/us/products/detai...

rather than getting a router.

I hope this helps.
Report Abuse
 GTB
You do not need a second router; run a CAT6 or CAT5 line from a switch port of your router to your room and then terminate w a female RJ 45 socket.
Report Abuse
 raidrunner
What you are looking for is called a wireless access point.
Report Abuse
 chrisjbsc
Yes.

Do i need a router?

Do i need a router?
I have a desktop that DOES NOT have wifi. I want to move this computer to another room not near the modem and I don't want to have an ethernet cord. I have a wifi usb adapter. My question is can i use the wifi usb adapter without a router? If so how?
 Follow   14 answers Report Abuse
 Ianab
Confusing question.

I think you have some terminology confused.

You have a router, and I assume it means you have wifi already. The problem is likely that you don't have a strong wifi signal in the "distant room". Take a mobile device to that location and see that the signal is like. If you get an "OK" signal, then a wifi adaptor with a decent antenna should be all you need. Look for a PCIe card with a decent external antenna, preferable on a cable so you can mount it up high for better reception.

If there is no useful signal, then you need to look at other options like powerline adaptors or a wifi range extender. These are not "routers", just ways of boosting signal or sending it by another media.
Report Abuse
 Nichole
I have one.

It's always best to tell us the makes & models of the equipment you're talking about.
- So, what's the make & model of your modem/router?
- And what's the make & model of your USB Wi-Fi adapter?

And lastly, does your computer have a spare USB port to plug the Wi-Fi adapter into? If so, do it and see if your computer installs the proper driver for it.
Report Abuse
 Richard
A true modem can connect only to one device, and that is by wire (usually by Ethernet, but it could be USB or even RS232 for older modems).

Look at the IP address your computer has (using ipconfig in Windows or ifconfig in Linux). If the address is in one of the following ranges:

10.0.0.0 to 10.255.255.255
172.16.0.0 to 172.31.255.255
192.168.0.0 to 192.168.255.255

then there is a router. Many modern routers include an integrated modem.

If it is a wireless router, then it will be capable of offering WiFi; however, there are both wireless and non-wireless types of routers.

If you have a router, look at the gateway address in the ipgonfig/ifconfig output. Enter this address into an Internet browser and this should allow you log on to the router to access its configuration pages. This will allow you to see if it has a wireless configuration section. You will need the router login name and password (not the WiFi details, which you can see once you have logged in). Check the 'routers' label or manual to see if it shows the login credentials. It's always best to tell us the makes & models of the equipment you're talking about.
- So, what's the make & model of your modem/router?
- And what's the make & model of your USB Wi-Fi adapter?

And lastly, does your computer have a spare USB port to plug the Wi-Fi adapter into? If so, do it and see if your computer installs the proper driver for it.
Report Abuse
 Richard
A true modem can connect only to one device, and that is by wire (usually by Ethernet, but it could be USB or even RS232 for older modems).

Look at the IP address your computer has (using ipconfig in Windows or ifconfig in Linux). If the address is in one of the following ranges:

10.0.0.0 to 10.255.255.255
172.16.0.0 to 172.31.255.255
192.168.0.0 to 192.168.255.255

then there is a router. Many modern routers include an integrated modem.

If it is a wireless router, then it will be capable of offering WiFi; however, there are both wireless and non-wireless types of routers.

If you have a router, look at the gateway address in the ipgonfig/ifconfig output. Enter this address into an Internet browser and this should allow you log on to the router to access its configuration pages. This will allow you to see if it has a wireless configuration section. You will need the router login name and password (not the WiFi details, which you can see once you have logged in). Check the 'routers' label or manual to see if it shows the login credentials.

If the new location is more than a few metres from the WiFi source and especially in a different room, then the WiFi speed might be significantly slower than the Ethernet connection provided. For a static device like a desktop PC, TV or similar, then Ethernet is almost always the best solution. Keep WiFi for portable devices and devices that do not have Ethernet capability. Take a look at Powerline adapters such as:

http://uk.tp-link.com/products/details/c...

Finally, whenever you ask questions like this, include details of the make and model of significant equipment. In this case you should have identified the details of the device you described as a modem.

I hope this helps.
Report Abuse
 Neil
No. The adapter is just one end of the connection.
Report Abuse
 Tracy L
Does the modem have a wifi built in? If not how will you get a wifi signal from the modem to your computer? These days many modems are also routers that include a wifi connector. If you have one, it IS A ROUTER as well as a modem! If that is the case, no you do not need a router. If that isn't the case then yes you need a router that includes wifi. These days NO ONE should connect directly to a modem anyway. If you get a PUBLIC IP (which the modem usually delivers) you are much more exposed to hackers than if you are issued a private IP from a router!